infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years in objects like this one.

infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years in objects like this one.

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.

"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]

[Read more]

[Photo 1 Credit[Photo 2 Credit]

pogosticks:

Mushrooms in Mount Kinabalu National Park, Sabah by Bernard Dupont

pogosticks:

Mushrooms in Mount Kinabalu National Park, Sabah by Bernard Dupont

(via blackkittenclan)

buggirl:

Into the Amazon….  we had to be VERY careful crossing this bridge, not only was it quick rickety, you couldn’t touch the railing because they were covered in bullet ants!  The jungle is a scary and awesome place!  Here is my friend, Leah, making it look easy!
Tiputini, Ecuador

Wow!

buggirl:

Into the Amazon….  we had to be VERY careful crossing this bridge, not only was it quick rickety, you couldn’t touch the railing because they were covered in bullet ants!  The jungle is a scary and awesome place!  Here is my friend, Leah, making it look easy!

Tiputini, Ecuador

Wow!

Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps)

cross-connect:

Artist Alexander Belozor is Ukraine’s first underwater painter.

"It is not only my environmental awareness that moves me. From the artistic point of view it is a serious impact into the development of art. Studying the underwater sphere I explore for myself and others the different laws of perception of sunlight by a human eye. This is a new and unexplored world for artists who paint in air sphere and study laws of refraction of light in the air. These personal discoveries are seen in artworks, because every scenery is a live impression of an artist who paints en plein air under water.”

(text from alexanderbelozor.blogspot.com)

blog | saatchi art | facebook

Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

rhamphotheca:

RAINBOW GRAPES
These may look like party balloons but they are actually rainbow grapes. These grapes aren’t a rare species, they are created during Véraison (when grapes turn from green to purple as they ripen). Image: BizarBin/Worth1000/Sesan Olasupo/Laritech Garden Seeds Branch Company
(via: ScienceAlert)

rhamphotheca:

RAINBOW GRAPES

These may look like party balloons but they are actually rainbow grapes. These grapes aren’t a rare species, they are created during Véraison (when grapes turn from green to purple as they ripen).

Image: BizarBin/Worth1000/Sesan Olasupo/Laritech Garden Seeds Branch Company

(via: ScienceAlert)

libutron:

Fragile Dapperling

The pictures show a top view and a side view of the mushroom Leucocoprinus fragilissimus (Agaricaceae), a species with wide distribution in many continents, quite characteristic by its shape and color. 

Although the cap of this mushroom is bell-shaped when young, it becomes broadly convex and uplifted in age. The caps are up to 4.5 cm wide, and its surface is translucent-striate from the margin of the disc, pale yellowish white, resembling the paper umbrellas used to decorate cocktails.

Underside the gills are white.The stalk is thick and extremely fragile, pale yellow when fresh, darkening in age, and coated overall with tiny yellowish scales.

Reference: [1]

Photos: [Top: ©Kim Fleming | Locality: Abbeville County, South Carolina, US] - [Bottom: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Shopchoppy River, Craig Nelson’s House, Wakulla County, Florida, US]

libutron:

Eastern Collared Lizard
The Eastern collared lizard, Crotaphytus collaris (Crotaphytidae), is native to much of the central and southwestern United States, as well as to northern Mexico. 
The eastern collared lizard eats lizards, insects, and plant matter. When chasing prey, eastern collared lizards often run on their hind legs, with their front legs and tail raised off of the ground. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Michael Menefee
Locality: Moab, Utah, US

libutron:

Eastern Collared Lizard

The Eastern collared lizard, Crotaphytus collaris (Crotaphytidae), is native to much of the central and southwestern United States, as well as to northern Mexico. 

The eastern collared lizard eats lizards, insects, and plant matter. When chasing prey, eastern collared lizards often run on their hind legs, with their front legs and tail raised off of the ground. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Michael Menefee

Locality: Moab, Utah, US

(via dendroica)

theoceaniswonderful:

Leafy Seadragon by PacificKlaus

theoceaniswonderful:

Leafy Seadragon by PacificKlaus

(via ymmvor)

cvinceillustration:

Mah face with my final degree show perspex pieces!

cvinceillustration:

Mah face with my final degree show perspex pieces!

(via scientificillustration)

minusmanhattan:

Sylvenstein Lake and Bridge Bavarian Alps by Peter Adams.

minusmanhattan:

Sylvenstein Lake and Bridge Bavarian Alps by Peter Adams.

nubbsgalore:

the timid european ground squirrel, stopping to smell the daisies, photographed in vienna by julian rad, who explains, “you have to be at eye level with the squirrels. that means you have to lay on your stomach for quite a few hours in order to get them in front of your lens. you have to make yourself invisible. it is important that they have no indication you are there.” (see also: more precious lil woodland buddies)

(via vitejie)

ichthyologist:

Banded Jawfish (Opistognathus macrognathus)

Jawfishes are mouthbrooders, which means that they take care of their eggs in the safety of their own mouths. The duty lies with the male and typically lasts for around 8-10 days before the eggs hatch. During this time, he will continually rotate the mass of eggs to ensure that they are evenly aerated with fresh water.


Kevin Bryant via Flickr

libutron:

Fern sporangium
Micrograph of a fern sporangium, showing spores inside and outside.
A sporangium is a structure producing and containing spores. In ferns, sporangia occur in lines or clusters called sori. typically found on the underside of the leaf (the orange or yellow spots you see in ferns). A single sori may contains many sporangia.
Photo credit: ©Frederic Labaune

libutron:

Fern sporangium

Micrograph of a fern sporangium, showing spores inside and outside.

A sporangium is a structure producing and containing spores. In ferns, sporangia occur in lines or clusters called sori. typically found on the underside of the leaf (the orange or yellow spots you see in ferns). A single sori may contains many sporangia.

Photo credit: ©Frederic Labaune