brains-and-bodies:

From The Scientist



"Image of the Day: Bongo-netted Baby"



This tiny larva—either an octopus or a squid in the making—was captured in a remotely operated underwater vehicle’s bongo-shaped suction net.”(Credit: NOAA, Matt Wilson and Jay Clark) bit.ly/1l0Fmxq

Anyone know which it is?

brains-and-bodies:

From The Scientist

"Image of the Day: Bongo-netted Baby"
This tiny larva—either an octopus or a squid in the making—was captured in a remotely operated underwater vehicle’s bongo-shaped suction net.”
(Credit: NOAA, Matt Wilson and Jay Clark) 
bit.ly/1l0Fmxq
Anyone know which it is?
allcreatures:


Wildlife photographer Nicolas Reusens spent hours crouched in a cave in Costa Rica, often up to his knees in water, to take this photo of a jumping frog

Picture: NICOLAS REUSENS / CATERS NEWS (via Pictures of the day: 22 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Wildlife photographer Nicolas Reusens spent hours crouched in a cave in Costa Rica, often up to his knees in water, to take this photo of a jumping frog

Picture: NICOLAS REUSENS / CATERS NEWS (via Pictures of the day: 22 August 2014 - Telegraph)

lifeunderthewaves:


Beauty and The Beast


A female freediver takes in the underwater scene, as a lemon shark slowly swims by



Photograph by Raul Boesel

lifeunderthewaves:

Beauty and The Beast
A female freediver takes in the underwater scene, as a lemon shark slowly swims by
Photograph by Raul Boesel

(via sharklagoon)

rhamphotheca:

Crayfish Turn Blood Cells into Brain Cells
by Christie Lepisto
… Scientists (have been) studying crayfish, which continuously regenerate neurons in their sensitive smelling organs and exposed eyestalks. Studying the process, known as neurogenesis, in crayfish could help us understand how humans maintain their brain health, and where the process goes wrong.
Scientists found that crayfish have a natural circuit for harboring blood cells similar to our white blood cells in a ‘nursery’ where they are turned into neurons. The cells are converted to have properties of stem cells, which allows them to be reprogrammed to become neurons.
What surprised scientists in this discovery is the link between the immune system and the regeneration of neurons. The blood cells converted to neurons in crayfish, called hemocytes, are produced by the immune system, in a process that parallels the production of white blood cells that are the front-line troops of the human immune system. In the words of co-auther Dr. Irene Söderhäll, of Uppsala University in Sweden..
(read more: TreeHugger)
photograph by Coniferconifer/Flickr

That’s amazing!

rhamphotheca:

Crayfish Turn Blood Cells into Brain Cells

by Christie Lepisto

… Scientists (have been) studying crayfish, which continuously regenerate neurons in their sensitive smelling organs and exposed eyestalks. Studying the process, known as neurogenesis, in crayfish could help us understand how humans maintain their brain health, and where the process goes wrong.

Scientists found that crayfish have a natural circuit for harboring blood cells similar to our white blood cells in a ‘nursery’ where they are turned into neurons. The cells are converted to have properties of stem cells, which allows them to be reprogrammed to become neurons.

What surprised scientists in this discovery is the link between the immune system and the regeneration of neurons. The blood cells converted to neurons in crayfish, called hemocytes, are produced by the immune system, in a process that parallels the production of white blood cells that are the front-line troops of the human immune system. In the words of co-auther Dr. Irene Söderhäll, of Uppsala University in Sweden..

(read more: TreeHugger)

photograph by Coniferconifer/Flickr

That’s amazing!

Lessy Sebastian

(Source: foxpapa, via swagcontroltomajortom)

clusterpod:

Tiny Aleurina ferruginea

Guvvy’s Lagoon, Chauncy Vale, Tasmania.

clusterpod:

Tiny Aleurina ferruginea

Guvvy’s Lagoon, Chauncy Vale, Tasmania.

libutron:

Spotted Ratfish - Hydrolagus colliei

Hydrolagus colliei is a species of cartilaginous fish of the chimaeras group (Chimaeriformes - Chimaeridae).

Chimaeras and chimeroid fish (ratfish, rabbitfish, and ghostsharks), are perhaps the oldest and most enigmatic groups of fishes alive today. Their closest living relatives are sharks, but their evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400 million years ago, and they have remained an isolated group ever since. They are considered the missing link between the bony and cartilaginous fishes because they have the characteristics of both.

The Spotted ratfish, Hydrolagus collieihas a large rabbit-like head with a broad duckbill-shaped snout and large green eyes. The body tapers toward the posterior end of the fish; the tail makes up almost half the length of the overall length of the entire fish. There are prominent lateral line canals on the scaleless skin of this fish. 

At the leading edge of the first dorsal fin is a prominent venomous spine. The spine can be dangerous and cause a painful wound. Fishers are reputed to fear the jaws of the ratfish more than they do the dorsal spine.

This species occurs in the eastern Pacific, from Cape Spencer, Alaska to Bahía Sebastian Vizcaíno, Baja California (Mexico). There is an Isolated population in the northern Gulf of California.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Dan Hershman |  [Top - Locality: Edmonds Underwater Park, Edmonds, Washington, US (2011)] - [Bottom - Locality: Three Tree Point, Burien, Washington, US (2012)]

myampgoesto11:

X-Ray GIFs by Cameron Drake | Behance 

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via kqedscience)

explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.
Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence. 
(via Visually)

explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.

Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence

(via Visually)

(Source: explore-blog, via dendroica)

earthlynation:

Shieldhead Gecko (Gonatodes caudiscutatus) (by Lucas M. Bustamante-Enríquez)

earthlynation:

Shieldhead Gecko (Gonatodes caudiscutatus) (by Lucas M. Bustamante-Enríquez)

(via ymmvor)

heythereuniverse:

Volvox | St4rshade



A colony of volvox through the microscope. Polarized light.

heythereuniverse:

VolvoxSt4rshade

A colony of volvox through the microscope. Polarized light.

textless

nubbsgalore:

palau’s jellyfish lake was once connected to the pacific ocean, but when the sea level dropped its population of jellyfish were left to thrive in the isolation of its algae rich waters. no longer needing to defend themselves from predators, the jellyfish lost their sting, allowing snorkelers to now swim with them as they make their daily 800 metre migration from one end of the lake to the other.

photos by (click pic) david kirkland, david doubilet, tomas kotoucjody macdonaldchean chong lim, eric changnadia aly and richard schneider  (see also: vancouver aquarium jellyfish)

(via we-are-star-stuff)

infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years in objects like this one.

infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years in objects like this one.

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.

"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]

[Read more]

[Photo 1 Credit[Photo 2 Credit]